What kind of red wine is good with Mexican food?

What drink goes well with Mexican food?

A beer, margarita or michelada (a beer cocktail with lime juice, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce and spices) is the obvious go-to beverage for Mexican food, but they can completely undercut the flavors of a delicate ceviche or overpower a simple tostada or tamale.

What red wine goes with tamales?

Tamales and Tempranillo

The sweet, earthy flavors of tamales pair particularly well with the fruity flavors of Tempranillo, especially when they’re stuffed with meat. You could also pair tamales with Pinot Noir.

What kind of wine is good with tacos?

Wine and tacos: Wines to choose

‘For this reason Grüner Veltliner and Riesling are excellent matches for tacos, and they work well with both fish and meat based tacos. ‘ Ache Derrington recommends Riesling too.

Is red or white wine better with Mexican food?

#1 The Rule of Spice The general rule is that the spicier the food, the colder and sweeter the wine should be. Also, lower alcohol wines and moderate tannins dissolve the burning sensation of capsicum.

Rice Dishes.

TEX-MEX DISHES RECOMMENDED WINE
Hardshell Tacos Rioja Reserva

Do tacos go with red wine?

Slightly sweet, low-alcohol wines are your best friend when enjoying spicy food. Thankfully, white, rosé, and red wines can all go well with tacos, so whatever your vino preferences are, you have options. … Dry rosé and light red wines are also great choices.

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What kind of wine do you serve with Mexican food?

The most successful wines are fresh, sleek, and crisp with acidity. Good white choices include Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Grigio (also known as Pinot Gris), dry Riesling, and Albariño, a crisp, citrusy knockout from northwestern Spain that’s phenomenal with green tomatillo-chili sauces.

Does red wine go with Mexican food?

If smoky, earthy chipotle, achiote or pasilla chilies or grilled meats are dominating the flavors, look at Malbecs, Tempranillos or red Rhône wines. Or, if your version of Mexican food is something very cheesy and heavy, Zinfandel, Sangiovese or Barberas might be a good place to start.