How are wines named and labeled?

How wines are named and their purposes?

Naming a wine is primarily about determining whether to use the region or base it on the primary grape variety used to produce the vintage. European wines are most commonly named after the region, but the use of grape variety is a popular naming strategy in the United States.

Why is it called wine?

“Wine” comes from the Old English word “win” (which is pronounced like “wean”). The Old English form was descended from the Latin “vinum,” or as the Romans wrote it, “VINVM.” “Vinum” in Latin seems to be related to the Latin word for vineyard, “vinea.” But I’ve also read that “vinum” can mean “vine” in Latin too.

What does NV mean on wine label?

What are non-vintage wines? A non-vintage wine is created by blending together a number wines from different vintages. In a lot of the wine descriptions when you look for the vintage year and see “NV”, this designates a Non Vintage wine.

How do you tell if a wine is dry by the label?

You rarely know in advance how sweet the wine will be because only some Vouvray producers list the terms “dry” or “sweet” on the label. Look for “sec” if you want to be certain it’s dry (“moelleux” and “doux” denote sweet).

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What are the parts of a wine label?

In part one of this guide, we’ll look at the most common features of a wine label.

  • Brand/producer name. This often features prominently on the label. …
  • Wine name. The wine’s name differentiates it from other bottles within the producer’s range. …
  • Geographical Indication (GI) …
  • Grape variety. …
  • Vintage. …
  • abv. …
  • Other terms.