Is it okay to drink vodka that has been sitting out?

Is it bad to drink alcohol that’s been sitting out?

Expired alcohol doesn’t make you sick. If you drink liquor after it’s been open for more than a year, you generally only risk a duller taste. Flat beer typically tastes off and may upset your stomach, whereas spoiled wine usually tastes vinegary or nutty but isn’t harmful.

Will vodka go bad if not refrigerated?

The answer to that question is a matter of quality, not safety, assuming proper storage conditions – when properly stored, a bottle of vodka has an indefinite shelf life, even after it has been opened.

Can you leave vodka at room temp?

Vodka. “Vodka can be kept at room temperature (and often is),” says Jonathan Hemi of Crystal Head Vodka. He prefers to store his bottle in the freezer “so it is always cold and ready to use.”

Does alcohol lose its potency when left open?

Ethyl alcohol evaporates out of alcoholic beverages whenever they’re exposed to air. For example, an opened beer stored at room temperature loses about 30 percent of its alcohol overnight, or in about 12 hours.

Should open vodka be refrigerated?

Store Hard Liquor at Room Temperature

There’s no need to refrigerate or freeze hard liquor whether it’s still sealed or already opened. Hard liquors like vodka, rum, tequila, and whiskey; most liqueurs, including Campari, St. … The professionals don’t refrigerate them!

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Should Smirnoff vodka be refrigerated?

The rule I use is: If it’s under 15% alcohol or if the base is wine, it goes in the fridge once it’s open. Spirits like whiskey, rum, gin, vodka, etc. don’t need to be refrigerated because the high alcohol content preserves their integrity.

Is it OK to put vodka in the freezer?

It turns out you really shouldn’t keep your vodka – if it’s the good stuff, at least – in the freezer at all. … If you’re drinking cheap vodka, it’s not bad to keep it in the freezer, since cold temperatures will also mask notes that are “aggressive” and “burning,” Thibault says.